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to testify on the nato summit which the united states is proud to be hosting in chicago on may 20th and may 21st. with your permission, senator, i would like to submit my full statement and summarize my comments here. >> we appreciate and without objection the full statement will be in the record. >> i appreciate the support and the sustained recognition of the significance of this alliance, transatlantic security. this chicago summit will be the first on american soil in 13 years and the first ever outside of washington. in adang to the community to showcase our nation's great cities a symbol of nato to the united states. it is also an opportunity to underscore to the american people the continued value of this alliance and security challenges we face today. nearly 18 months ago the allies unveiled a new strategic concept for focus in the 21st century. building on the decisions taking in lisbon, the allies have three objectives. was a capabilities and partnerships and if i might, i'd like to say a few words about these. on afghanistan the isaf coalition has prevented that country from serv
, it david miliband, a former u.k. ambassador to the united states, and my former british colleague at nato. we have widespread support for this report. we are very grateful for their intellectual import and personal support, so that is what i wanted to say. at the order is for us to have a brief conversation, and then we will be happy to take whatever questions you have. thank you. [applause] >> thank you very much for that. first of all, it is important to state that the atlantic council as a council does not take a point of view on anything, because it would just be too hard to get all of the members to agree, but i do think one thing we all agree on is a strong alliance and an enduring alliance, and this report points us in that direction. let me ask probably just two questions, and i will go to the audience right away, and two of the more controversial points, clearly, what you're saying on germany is tough, and it is saying it to a germany where many germans would argue, are we not doing the most important thing we could possibly do for the future of europe right now, which is aiding
was going to be the great seal of the united states. and a certain group of american leaders thought that it should be the bald eagle but another group said no, the image of the united states, the seal should show moses leading the children of israel out of bondage and into the promised land. there was this heated debate. america came this close to having moses as its national symbol. you got the folically challenged bird instead. but the authors of the moses seal were none other than thomas jefferson and benjamin franklin. so they had internalized the biblical narrative. now, for many of this generation of founding mothers and founding fathers, the fact that they were the new israel meant that they had a kinship relationship with the old israel, the jewish people. it meant since they were -- they had inherited a new promised land. they had a connection with the old promised land. and they concluded that to be good christians, to be good americans, it was their divinely ordained duty to help the old israel go back and restore their ancient kingdom to help god fulfill his promises to
of evaluative and educational process that does justice to this committee and justice to the united states senate ratification process, i announce today that i do not currently intend to bring the treaty to a vote before the november elections. we will have extensive hearings. we will do our due diligence. we'll prepare for a vote, but unless somehow the dynamic were to shift or change, we will wait until the passions of the election have subsided before we vote. my hope and expectation is that everyone will exhaust all avenues of inquiry and carefully consider the arguments on both sides. the contentious political season will now give us a chance to do what this committee has historically done best, which is not to politicize but to spend serious thoughtful time deliberating and debating all of the questions of substance. i'm pleased to see that the internet is already beginning to buzz with some discussion of this. but i will say up front there's a lot of misinformation and there's a certain amount of mythology, so i look forward to the process of clearing up the misinformation and the m
of international waters. 162 countries and the european community have ratified the treaty but the united states is not to read to the secretary of state hillary clinton and defense secretary leon panetta urged the senate to approve the treaty setting national security, job creation and oil exploration. they testified at the senate foreign relations committee. it's just under three hours. >> the hearing will come to order. thank you all very much for being with us today. secretary clinton, secretary panetta and general dempsey, welcome, we are privileged to have you here today. we thank you for joining us. it's a rare occasion in any committee but in this committee when we have simultaneously a panel of witnesses that brings together americans top diplomat, our country's top descends official and our nation's top military officer. your presence here altogether powerfully underscores the importance that you put on this issue. our committee shares the sense of importance which is why i hope without respect to party or ideology we begin an open, honest and comprehensive discussion about whether the
front of the u.s. capitol, this is half an hour. >> ladies and gentlemen, the president of united states. >> detail, colors. present arms. [silence] >> detail, color guard, right shoulder, order. arm. >> please stand for the assessment of the colors like united states capitol police, and remain standing for our national anthem. [silence] >> detail, color guar guard. present arms. >> we will now have the national anthem by kathy williams. ♪ oh, say, can you see ♪ by the dawn's early light ♪ what so proudly we hailed ♪ at the twilight's last gleaming? ♪ ♪ whose broad stripes and bright stars ♪ ♪ thro' the perilous fight ♪ o'er the ramparts we watched ♪ were so gallantly streaming t ♪ and the rockets red glare ♪ the bombs bursting in air ♪ gave proof through the night ♪ that our flag was still there ♪ ♪ oh, say, does that star-spangled banner yet wave ♪ ♪ o'er the land of the free ♪ and the home of the brave? >> detail, color guard. order, right shoulder, arms. >> please remain standing for the invocation. >> please join me in prayer. our gracious fathe
of real significance to the united states. to do that, we will dedicate 80% of our effort to four major cases. right now they are syria, kenya, north/central america and burma. then we'll have another eight to ten places where we can test new approaches or make a welcome difference by just sending the the right person at the right time. so far i think we're gaining traction in each of our major priority engagements. many of you are working in these places, and we realize that we won't know it all or know best about them, so we hope for your support. in syria we are providing a nontraditional surge to empower and unite a fractured, nonviolent opposition. as the secretary announced, that includes providing nonlethal assistance. we are also working with partners to set up an outpost for the internal opposition to coordinate and communicate with the international community. in kenya we are helping to develop plans to insure peaceful and credible elections a year before the vote. incidentally, kenya is one place where we've seen a potential model for broad cooperation and innovation. in nort
. as the president said, preventing a nuclear iran is in the interest of the united states. we have issued reports, and the most recent one was issued on and.ary 1 and it includes a distinguished panel of four democratic members of congress, admirals' and generals and also experts to area our last report supported the view that the best approached to this challenge is a simultaneous pursuit of a triple track policy, which is of diplomacy, tough sanctions, and a credible and invisible military threat. we also issued a white paper on each of those tracks. i want to highlight one recommendation on each of those tracks, and then i will change it over to mort zuckerman. and the military threat we believe the united states should boost the credibility of its military to air around us nuclear facilities, and we have spelled out how to do so. one element has been selling bunker busters' to israel. we do not advocate an israeli strike, but this will send a strong signal to tehran to negotiate in good faith, encourage other states that the alternative to supporting u.s. sanctions could be military conflict
a bigger problem within diplomacy. but the united states has been willing to use both force and diplomacy to really try to solve the problem. i think in the case of north korea, that that -- it's just not registered like that. that is not specific to any administration. we have had crises with north korea and every administration has made the same calculation. when we reach a crisis with north korea, are we willing to go all-out to the end to solve this thing, or do we want a solution that will park it momentarily, put him diplomatic tracks, present and kevin and want move on to the other issues that most concern us, whether it is the domestic and economic situation or iraq or afghanistan or syria or the middle east peace process. these tend to be the more it important issues in u.s. foreign policy. >> the other issue that makes iraq different is the u.s. korea alliance. have you see the dynamics of the alliance playing into our ability to adjust the top concerns that the u.s. has related to north korea's nuclear program? >> undeniably, and when we look at the situation, south korea is mo
billion that would be royalties that would be paid to the isa as "pos opposed to the united states and of course go to the organization in kingston, jamaica for redistribution to the developing world. and this is the first time in history that an international organization, the u.n. in this case, would possess taxing authority over this country. now, i've heard the veto argument. discussed by one of the other members here. i think the secretary ritsch. it's really not too important to discuss that, because there are two entities that would make that determination. you have the council, the 36th-member council, the assembly, to make these decisions, but the point is, under article 160, it's going to cost us. well, let's see. yeah. under article 82, payments and contributions shall be made annually rp to all production at a site after this period's time. what we're saying, it's going to be paid regardless of where you think it should go or where you think it is going to go. the second thing i want to kov herb is the environmental and, we in this, for the ten years now have rejected i
. china sits right on the border with north korea. the last thing the united states or china wants is some sort of confrontation or a configuration of the peninsula that would cause the two to butt heads as they did in 1953, and so i think any time there is serious thought given to some sort of military action, this is constantly at the top -- not even the top, but half way up the ladder, this is a concern that every u.s. president, i think, has had to think about seriously. i think that's certainly one of the reasons, the china factor, and the other is that we, united states went into iraq or afghanistan because it became thee top foreign policy issue on which the administration saw a revolution, a final resolution. now, we can debate whether that was the right or wrong thing. many americans think it was the wrong thing. many americans think that nothing was resolved there, and, you know, that's a completely different question. i mean i think the point for korea is that i don't really think that the north korea issue has risen to that level of priority for an administration. it's been a c
the veto word is not used, also not used in the constitution of the united states but no one doubts the president has it. we have the ability to do it to the language that is there. that will become a bit more clear as we come forward. >> thank you, chairman kerry. i'm very glad that we're having this in today and i appreciate all of you for being here. senator webb and i sent chairman kerry and ranking member luber a letter back in april urging we move forward to consideration of law of the sea treaty and i'm grateful to your broad and searching and supportive testimony here today. when i was brand-new to the senate, one of the earlier meetings i took was with the then outgoing chief of naval operations. when i asked him what is the single most important thing we can do to help the navy over the next decade, he said without hesitation, ratify the law of the sea treaty. i was taken aback by the. given other budget priorities, operational issues, as it turned out admiral estimation of the importance of this issue is shared i'm stomach every living chief of naval operations not to men
, this is in the security interests of the united states. over the past four years we of issued four report . the most recent was on february 1. as jason indicated, it included a distinguished panel of democratic members of congress, three retired generals and admirals, and distinguished foreign policy and energy experts. the last report reinforced the view we have always held is that the best approach to this crisis is a simultaneous pursuit of a triple track policy, which is diplomacy, tough sanctions, and credible, in visible military threat, and also, we issued a white paper in the past couple of months on each of those tracks. i will quickly highlight one recommendation on each of those, and then i will turn it over to mort zuckerman. sanctions, the progress of the nuclear program to determine the degree to which sanctions are forcing iran to slow down the clear development. we believe the united states should boost the credibility of its own and israel's military threat to iran as a nuclear facility. we have spelled out how to do so, and one element has been selling israel bunker busters' and ae
is that the united states as a individual nation and nato collectively as an alliance have to do long-term thinking about where it. wants to be in ten or eight years time. and outline the type of missions it envisions undertaking in the future and what capabilities will be required to undertake the missions. and kind of set some -- identify some kind of priority areas for the alliance knowing that most allies simply aren't going to be able to do everything every time. not every ally will be able to do everything from peace keeping to high intensity combat. we have a number of al thrice have reached that point and are starting to specialize and develop these capabilities if it's not coordinated you could end up with everybody. it's like a pot luck dinner. you don't have any main course when everybody brings desert. the summit going to try to start the alliance on the healthier course. but it's also going to start first and foremost with delivering on some commitments made in lisbon. you might remember, the alliance watched the lisbon critical caimentn'ts commitment. where the alliance identified ten
nautical miles from shore. the relevant area for the united states is probably more than 1.5 times the size of texas. in fact, we believe it could be considerably larger. u.s. oil and gas companies are now ready, willing, and able to explore this area. but they have made it clear to us that they need the maximum level of international legal certainty before they will or could make the substantial investments. and we believe create many jobs in doing so, needed to extract these far offshore resources. if we were a party to the convention, we would gain international recognition of our sovereign rights, including by using the convention's procedures and therefore, be able to give our oil and gas companies this legal certainty. staying outside the convention, we simply cannot. the second development concerns deep seabed mining which takes place in that part of the ocean floor that is beyond any country's jurisdiction. now, for years, technological challenges meant that deep seabed mining was only theoretical. today's advances make it very real. but it's also very expense of. and before any com
as dark winter, where they theorized the placing of smallpox in three locations in the united states, major metropolitan hubs with air terminals, and within a year it concluded, this independent study concluded that there would be more than a million americans dead as a result of that. not a nuclear attack. not a chemical attack, but in effect a biological attack. and not a complicated one. not something that takes a lot of money or a lot of skill sets. imagine a million people -- imagine our country, if the goal of terror is to terrorize, to alter your behavior. imagine what the behavior pattern would have been in our country. there would be martial law. you'd have people guarding their state boundaries to try to avoid -- when i grew up, if you had smallpox or chickenpox or measles, they put a quarantine sign on your house. and you weren't allowed to go out. and no one was allowed to go into your house. this is back in the 1930s. you can imagine the whole country doing that. petrified. because of the lack of protection against smallpox. and that was very much in the president's mind
the men and women who is died defending the united states in the first memorial day since the end the iraq war. the president laid a wreath at arlington national cemetery before saying all men and women who have fought and sacrificed their lives for the united states have the very same connection. listen. >> while their stories could be separated by hundreds of years and thousands of miles, they rest here. together. side-by-side. row by row. each of them loved this country. and everything it stands for. more than life itself. >>trace: the president vowed to take care of the troop whose make him heavy long after their service is over and moments ago the president held a ceremony at vietnam memorial as we showed you to mark the start of a 13 year project to honor the 50-year anniversary of the vietnam war. and now to ed live at the white house. ed the ceremony at wall was a long time coming for many vietnam veterans. >> it was. and that's because of the fact that when many of the vietnam veterans came home those fortunate enough to come home because over 58,000 who died during that conflict,
states. hispanic children are at the highest level of poverty in the history of the united states. i think the challenge is not how to bring them over to immigration reform or dialogue. just to make sure the latino community knows these facts and understands the failure of president obama. >> i agree with you there is a lot of ammunition. these comments about self deportation have indicated to some in the community he does not have respect for them. go to south texas and talk to latino ranch and farm owners and small businesses and members of the hispanic community. they are hard asses because they are the first to feel the adverse affect. cartels are shooting at them. are competing for jobs. there are a lot of reasons why they are hard asses but they do want to know the presidential candidate has respect for the community and in recognition this is not all a mexican problem. half the people here illegally came from hong kong the, nigeria on a visa and overstating it. the fact that all the people from central america are unworthy is a real problem. >> thank you. >> we will get behind
can win an academy award someday and the guy behind you can be a future president of the united states or even better than that the mayor of new york city the guy in front of you could be a future nobel laureate not to your right but certainly the one to your left. it's even worse than it looks in which they argue that washington partisanship has caused congress to become dysfunctional. we talked to the authors on wednesday washington journal. this is just under an hour. >> the gentleman that for a book are taking a look at congress it's even worse than that looks how the american constitutional system collided with the new politics of extremism. joining us, the author norman and co-author resident scholar of the american enterprise institute thomas mann of the brookings institution where he served studies senior fellow. gentlemen, thanks for joining us. >> happy to be with you. >> the question is if it is worse than it looks, what exactly is worse? >> guest: we are now in a situation which we have a fundamental mismatch between our political parties which would become intensely polari
. i'm david wynder. i represent water aid here in the united states. and we've been involved in putting together a partnership called the summitation for water which met here last weekend in washingt washington. in the partnership we've been together, multilateral, bilateral organizations, civil society organizations, national governments to really think conservatively of how you can get more resources into the sector but also how you can improve the use and management of those resources. it's only been going for three or four years. the united states government only joined at the last meeting, but we've been very encouraged by this example of how to bring together a multicultural partnership. i'd like the panelis to comment on this. is there an example of these that can be replicated in other sectors? and what do you see as the value? thank you. >> glad to be able to be at the ministerial meeting in washington that talked about that partnership. and we're trying to take you to the gates foundation, especially on the sanitation side. i think what is intriguing about it -- i'm
to north korea's missile program, missiles that are targeted to the united states. in light of that, what is your view of the administration's position to lift export controls to china? on lethal weapons? >> you know, one of the -- it is conventional wisdom, but it is very wrong. the conventional wisdom is a china that looks hundreds of years in the future, they have thousands of years of history. china knows, they are thinking three moves ahead of us on the chessboard. if that's true, why do they continue to prop up a north korean regime? why would you want to prop up a regime that has 150,000 or 200,000 people starving to death? why would you want one that continues? it's only cash is nuclear weapons, and continuing to not only move forward but exporting those kinds of technologies into the most volatile parts of the world. the chinese leader was here in town, and there were four or five of us. i said why? why do you continue to prop up the regime? it is a blot on the reputation of your government. and his answer was -- and i'm not making this up. chinese translator, senator mccain is w
the number one strategic threat to the united states. that sounds very yesteryear i must say. we will have other panels talk about russia but i don't think anyone will buy on to that proposition and as for china, we all know that china is an easy target in some ways, but we have already mentioned people -- the wise heads of the republican party. i can assure you just read henry kissinger's latest book on china and candidate mitt romney will get a lot of advice between now and when it gets anywhere near the convention not to mention the white house to go easy on china. one reason i am puzzled by it is that will not win an election. it is the economy. >> you want to pick up on this? >> there are a lot of things about the nature of the challenge that we face. i start with the point that the economy is more dependent on the global economy than in the past and the collective action challenge homi talked about is real. i differ when i look at successful administrations. the republicans run as if american power unfettered from multilateral institutions is the way to run the world. they enter offi
the years the united states and other democratic countries have imposed sanctions on the burmese government to pressure for change. now that there seems to be some progress at what pace should those sanctions be lifted? how does the u.s. provide rewards for progress without losing he have arerage for further change? >> i understand from a news broadcast this morning that senator mccain is thinking of the suspension of sanctions rather than lifting of sanctions. it possible first step. what has been done at the e.u., what has been done by the e.u., they would suspend sanctions but not lift them all together. that is a way sending a strong message that we will help the process of democratization. if this is not maintained we will have this think of other ways of making sure that the aspirations of people of burma for democracy is respected. i am am not against the suspension of sanctions as long as the people of the united states feel this is the right thing to do at the moment. i do, i do have a caution though. i sometimes feel that things, people are too optimistic about the scene in burma.
of this evening, ann-sofie moto, paul pullman, and the list of men and women in the united states armed forces, and his royal highness prince harry. this is really distinguished company indeed. [ applause ] general colin powell, maestro andrew previn, honorable members of the congress, excellencies is, members of the diplomatic core, participants, ladies and gentlemen, thank you as well for your warm welcome. and thank you to the board of the atlantic council, chairman hagel and president kempfe for this honor. i take it as a symbol of the partnership of the united states, the united nations, and on behalf of all the staff and peacekeeping operations staff. and imhumbly accept this honor. seldom if ever has our principles been more relevant. seldom if ever has this partnership been more vital than at this moment. ladies and gentlemen, we just celebrated and commented the list of men and women of u.s. armed forces. as the secretary general of the united nations, my thoughts are with more than 120,000 u.n. peacekeeping operation staff from more than 120 countries, contribution countries who are
combat troops go home. >> today i signed a historic agreement between the united states and afghanistan that defines a new kind of relationship between our countries. a future in which afghans are responsible for the security of their nation, and we build an equal partnership between two sovereign states. >> obama and afghan president karzai signed a strategic partnership agreement. it cements of u.s. commitment to afghanistan after american combat troops leave in 2014. it will be effective until 2024. the deal allows u.s. forces to train afghan soldiers and engage in sweep operations against al qaeda. >> our goal is to destroy al qaeda, and we are on a path to do exactly that. >> this was obama's first visit to afghanistan since december 2010, and a third since he took office. it coincided with the one-year anniversary of the death of al qaeda leader osama bin laden. >>> the u.n. security council is considering black listing about 40 more north korean companies. the new sanctions would be in response to pyongyang's failed launch of what it called a sat lie-carrying rocket. the council
indicated that it will accept mr. chen's application for prerpt travel documents. the united states government expects that the chinese government will expeditiously process his applications for these documents. now 11 days later, mr. chen is still in the same hospital room with his wife and two children under defacto house arrest. although mr. chen is under the impression that his application for a passport was made last when he was visited by a chinese official and under chinese law blind persons are supposed to be able to apply orally for travel documents, he has not been notified of any further action on the application. with can exception the half-hour each morning and a afternoon that the children are escorted outside by one of the nurse, he and and his family are not allowed to leave the hospital and no one is allowed to see them. anyone who attempts to see mr. chen risks severe retaliation. a lawyer attempted to visit mr. chen many the homt. he was forcibly taken away by police officers. it was later reported that he was beaten so severely that he lost his hearing in at leas
, in the united states needs to be a part of it. charles taylor gets a bit the- year sentence for war crimes described as some of the most heinous in history. in the digital age, bringing back the good-old fashioned bookshop. er inlcome to our view mirro around the world. 13 bodies apparently executed were found in the eastern part of syria. the killings were discovered even as the u.n. security council held a meeting on last week's massacre that left more than 100 people dead and sparked wide-right combination of the regime. james robbins starts our coverage. >> no sign of the plea for peace in syria being heated. our creeks of violence in different parts of the country. -- outbreaks of violence in different parts of the country. last friday's massacre took place in houla. >> the syrian government, people are extremely troubled with this heinous and unjustified terrorist killing that took place and houla. today and other massacre was uncovered. -- today another massacre was uncovered. some were shot at close range. the fears that violence could spread through the region. >> in the worst cas
with the run-up regarding chen guangcheng, who has saw refuge at the u.s. embassy. >> the united states raises the importance of human rights and fundamental freedoms. we believe all governments do have to answer to citizens aspirations for dignity and the rule of law. no nation can or should deny those rights. as president obama said this week, a china that protect the rights of all the citizens will be a stronger and more prosperous nation. of course, a stronger partner on behalf of our common goals. >> i think in many ways, it probably will. yesterday, we had a deal between china and america of trying to put that case behind them. there are new damaging details and they keep emerging. the case will overshadow these talks. certainly, if american diplomats will come under pressure over this issue. we just heard from the u.s. secretary of state hillary clinton, she did not specifically mention his case, but she said that china could not deny the aspirations of its citizens. >> martin, we know has -- we know he has told the reuters news agency that he wants to leave for the united states instea
this comports with the constitution and united states and international law. white house spokesman charge any got a lot of questions about this at the briefing but insisted this is fully consistent with united states law. >> we were at all times going to act in a manner both lawful and consistent with our values. and he has done that in both cases, very serious about protecting the united states and the citizens. >> now carney referred to a speech given by the president's counterterrorism advisor last month here in washington, dc, and he said the program is consistent with international law because the united states right now is at war with al qaeda so we have wide latitude to launch the drone strikes at yemen or pakistan. what is interesting about that, same justification used by the bush administration. for some of their acts. >>trace: and did the president have a different view of executive power during the 2008 campaign. >>reporter: he ripped into the bush administration saying they had too muscular approach to executive power and now there are questions whether that is the case after "ne
-starter for the united states. i yield. >> recognize the gentle lady from tennessee, miss blackburn. >> thank you, mr. chairman. welcome to our witnesses, we are glad that you are here in this room but i have no doubt that all around the world people are streaming this hearing because they want to see what our posture on this is going to be and i think as you've heard, that there is agreement, both sides of the aisle, that giving authority to an international governing body would put our nation's sovereignty at risk. we're concerned about that. and i think that the obama administration should be commended for helping thwart this power grab and i think we also need to realize this is one of those areas where it raises the concerns we had about this administration's effort to undermine our efforts, congress's efforts, in this developing fight against international regulatory schemes over the internet, because this administration moved forward with regulations over the management of networks in the united states. we're going to continue to work to rein in the explosion of the fcc, now is the time to exe
through the auspices of the united states in an account other, that i would make a proposal at council to try to make available those proposals in a public way. i expressed that to the itu officials as well as giving an indication that we will be making a proposal. we haven't yet worked out -- it hasn't been agreed to by counsel and we haven't worked out modalities for doing that, but we are very aware of this issue and i think this is a process benefit by making available those proposals that people can see them. >> thank you. now, my other question is this, you can tell by virtue of the interest we have here today and in other places than in the u.s., there is beginning to be a knowledge about and concerned about potentially the proposals that could be raised. we've mentioned some of the countries from which there might need concern or proponents said the concerns that we have. but they just really briefly, around the world, either countries in which they are as united and are working the same way that the u.s. government has 13 to be prepared to address these? maybe you could just n
enlightened than that of the united states of america. matched only perhaps by the -- by the admission, policy of governor schwarzenegger in california. who knows who his secretary of state might be. there are a lot of names floating out there. bob zellic, president of the world bank. was one. he believes that -- in dealing with china and other countries that, what's we should ask of countries is to be responsible stake holders in a rule based international economy. that's pretty close to the theme of bruce's paper. here is the one exception which i think will, is both curious in terms of its motivation and -- and affect -- and will probably fade. and that is, a lot of -- sort of cheap, bashing of other countries. john michael and i make the point in our paper that every country on the planet with two exceptions has to hope and pray is never mentioned during american presidential campaign. because if it is mentioned it is going to be bad. two exceptions are israel and great britain. and, of course, china has come up a lot. russia has come up a lot. for some reason has declared that russia is t
unedifying. and here we are, the united states of america, the inventor of modern democracy, and i suspect that many of you around the room, i know quite a few of you travel a great deal and you must hear the same things that the four of us do when we travel. what is going on in your country and when are you going to get this thing over with and get back to leading the world? the second consequence is that it has a extremely negative effect on the ability of the united states' government and the president himself to actually conduct foreign policy. because a lot of foreign policy requires, of course, the cooperation of the legislative branch. it is -- it is not just difficult, it's impossible to imagine getting any major treaty through. i mean, maybe there is some chance of the law of the sea getting through -- bruce would have a better sense of that than i. i know there are some optimistic signs. if you look at what this means for the two most important threats facing the planet today, which is our nuclear proliferation and climate change, we're dead in the water. and we're dead in the wa
between the united states and japan. today, we welcome you in that spirit. i have worked to strengthen the ties between our two nations. when prime minister noda and i met, we talk about strengthening. i want to thank you for the personal commitment you have brought to this endeavor. you have called the united states is japan's greatest asset. through our determination and humility we have seen this through. during our discussions today, the prime minister compared his leadership style to that of a point guard in basketball. he may not be flashy, but he stays focused and gets the job done. that has helped make this visit a milestone. am proud to announce we have agreed to a new joint vision to help shape the asian-pacific for decades to come. this is part of a broader effort i discussed in which the united states is, once again, beating in the asian-pacific region. this will remain the foundation of the security and foundations -- security and prosperity of our two nations and a cornerstone of regional peace and security. we reviewed the agreement that we reached last week to realign a
by alleging the president of the united states was not really the president of the united states. he intimated that president obama is secretly foreign. that was the basis of the donald trump flash in the pan candidacy years ago. >> why doesn't he show his birth certificate? i think she should. three weeks ago when i started, i thought he was born in this country and now i have doubt. >> based on what? >> his grandmother said he was born in kenya and she was there and witnessed the birth. he doesn't have a birth certificate or he hasn't shown it. if you are going to be the president of the united states you have to be born in this country and there's a doubt as to whether or not he is. >> that little brain curdling wallow in celebrity driven up chuck came to an abrupt end about one year ago when on a wednesday afternoon, the president of the united states held a press conference at the white house to release his freaking birth certificate, to put that nonsense to rest. that was on a wednesday afternoon. three days later on saturday, it was the white house correspondence dinner where the presid
the best math scores. ...the united states would be on that list. in 25th place. let's raise academic standards across the nation. let's get back to the head of the class. let's solve this. >>> jack cafferty is here with "the cafferty file." jack? >> wolf, president obama's support for same-sex marriage is sure to fire up parts of the liberal base it could alienate other parts including black voters. in other words, backing gay marriage might be a risky proposition for the president in an election year when it comes to one of the core voting blocs. in 2008, you'll recall african-americans were crucial in making this president the first black president. 96% of black voters supported obama and they made up 13% of the electorate. fast forward four years approximately while polls suggest america on the whole is moving toward supporting same-sex marriage. nbc-washington post voting say 56 are opposed to it and this opposition from blacks could hurt the president especially in the south. just this week, north killer carol blacks voted two to one in favor of an amendment in that state bannin
has to be agreed to by the united states, with its permanent seat, would have to agree to it. and the payments would mean that we were actually extracting valuable resources from the extended continental shelf. this is supported by the american oil and gas industry. because it only applies to such areas beyond 200 nautical miles. and i would note, too, senator, there is nothing unprecedented about payment being made under treaties for various benefits because here the benefit is being absolutely legally assured of sovereign rights over a vast area of common ocean and the legal certainty that comes with that. and we already make payments to the international telecommunications union, for example, because it helps to orbital slots to protect u.s. radio communications from harmful interference. so, there are precedence that demonstrate why this is in our interest. nothing is agreed to unless everybody in the convention agrees to it. now, standing on the outside, there may be something agreed to which later could be something we won't like, but we wouldn't be able to veto it, whi
the effort? joining me now is james spidermarx. so, some u.s. lawmakers said the united states should take the lead and involve itself militarily. why is syria different than let's say libya. syria certainly had a greater population, a smaller piece of geography, therefore, it's a lot more urbanized and it becomes a very entangled and tough target to go against. unlike libya that had pocket of e resistance that were spread out and there seemed to be at some point, a unified opposition against gadhafi. so that answer to the question in terms of the difference between those two. in other words, it's a tougher nut to crack, a harder problem and would entangle us greatly. >> when you say something shouldn't be done, what is that something that should be done? >> well, clearly, what has to happen is the united, let's take it from the top and work our way down. united states is going to lose in this particular confrontation if russia brokers the deal to try to get assad to step aside. russia then is the peacemaker, russia owns the cards and have now caused this great con fill in syria to go away
months. for in addition to the record levels of security assistance the united states was already providing israel, our administration secured an additional $205 million to help produce the short range rocket defense system iron dome. the purpose of this money was to enable israel to accelerate production of iron dome batteries. well, during the recent attacks from gaza, iron dome intercepted nearly 0% of the rockets it tried to engage. and that's dozens of deadly explosions done by otherwise have taken place at hospitals, schools, or homes. it's been a god send for besieged communities along israel's border with gaza and the department of defense i'd like to say has announced recently or intent to provide israel with additional support for this critical defensive system. in addition, we continue to work with israel on the arrow weapons system to intercept medium range ballistic missiles and david sling the shorter range missile defense system. against these procan you remember programs we continue to collaborate on a powerful system linked to an early u.s. warning system that cou
between drug prices here in the united states and the challenge of access to -- global access to medici medicines, two topics that are actually discussed separately but are actually interlinked. first a quick update on where we are today. global access to hiv medicines have increased over the last decade to reach a total of 7.4 million people as of 201090% of whom live in developing countries. this is an achievement unimaginable ten years ago. two of the enabling factors that were key for increasing access in developing counties in particular was first the dramatic reduction in the price of antiretroviral med since and second the inability of funding. in developing countries use has dropped from $10,000 per patient down to as low as $100 or less today. in other words, less than 1% of the patented u.s. price. these price reductions came about because of robust competition between developers. americans can be proud of these accomplishments because the u.s. government has played a key role in three elements of this story. first, for major investments by the nih and to hiv in the 1980s whic
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